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Discover Hopkins Programs

DISCOVER HOPKINS:

Mathematics of Infinity

  • Session I

Course Number: AS.110.160.41 (1 credit)
Instructor: Vitaly Lorman

Description: An interdisciplinary introduction to the history of infinity in mathematics, from Zeno's paradox to the development of calculus to the crisis in the foundations of mathematics in the early 20th century. We will read about history, discuss philosophy, and learn some mathematics (including a crash course in mathematical logic and proof, building up to the rigorous definition of limits). A previous course in calculus is not required, but some mathematical maturity will be necessary.

 

 

DISCOVER HOPKINS:

Examining Archaeological Objects

  • Session I

Course Number: AS.389.120.41 (1 credit)
Instructor: Sanchita Balachandran

  • Session II

Course Number: AS.389.120.51 (1 credit)
Instructor: Sanchita Balachandran

Description: In this course, we examine artifacts from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum in order to learn about the role of materials such as ceramics, metal, glass, faience and stone in the history, art and culture of the ancient world. We will visit local artists’ studios to understand how these materials are utilized today, and examine comparative examples in local art museums. Students will work hands on with artifacts each day.

 

 

DISCOVER HOPKINS:

What is Scientific Experimentation?

  • Session I

Course Number: AS.070.264.41 (1 credit)
Instructor: Bican Polat

Description: How do scientists design and conduct experiments? In what ways do experimental results advance our understanding of scientific theories? In this introductory course, we will discuss how experimentation contributes to scientific knowledge making. Reading a number of key articles, we will explore the ways in which an experimental model is developed in behavioral neuroscience. We will discuss how neurobiologists interpret psychological concepts and theories by drawing on animal experimentation.

 

 

Health Studies

DISCOVER HOPKINS HEALTH STUDIES:

Application of Abnormal Psychology to Forensic Cases

  • Session II

Course Number: AS.200.220.51 (1 credit)
Instructor: Lawrence Raifman, J.D., Ph.D.

  • Session III

Course Number: Session II: AS.200.220.61 (1 credit)
Instructor: Lawrence Raifman, J.D., Ph.D.

Description: This introductory course will examine the basic diagnostic psychology principles. To illustrate these principles the class will focus on investigating forensic psychology queries including: Does my client have a mental illness? Why did he or she act in such a self-defeating way? Should my client be punished or rehabilitated? To answer these questions we will apply our understanding of psychology and forensics to famous stories you likely already know. We will explore the reasons behind why a movie star would shoplift; why a policeman would commit a series of bank robberies in broad daylight; Or why a famous television actor would take his highly-publicized (and dangerous) meltdown on tour. As part of this course, students will visit with professionals in the field, view and analyze video and movies of forensic cases, and participate in mock trial exercises... More

 

DISCOVER HOPKINS HEALTH STUDIES:
Hopkins Medicine: Fostering Healthy Communities- Serving the Individual and the World

  • Session II

Course Number: AS.360.120.51 (1 credit)
Instructors: Daniel Teraguchi and Jessica Harrington
This course is taught at the JHMI Campus.

Description: This course will provide an introduction to the fields of medicine and public health. Through this course, students will explore the relationship between medicine and public health; be introduced to essential and transferable skills required to be effective in the health professions; gain exposure to basic components of service learning in connection with public health; obtain insight into medical school culture; and begin to develop an understanding of health in the context of a diverse and divided nation. Class sessions include discussions of relevant readings, presentations by professional guest speakers from the School of Medicine and the Bloomberg School of Public Health, and engaging critical thinking and teamwork activities. Students will also participate in field trips and a health related service learning project.

 

DISCOVER HOPKINS HEALTH STUDIES:
The Hospital

  • Session I
    Course Number:
    AS.360.118.41 (1 credit)
    Instructor: Alicia Puglionesi, MA
  • Session II

Course Number: AS.360.118.51 (1 credit)
Instructor: Alicia Puglionesi, MA

Description: Virtually all of us were born in one, most of us will eventually spend at least some time in one. Lots of you likely aspire to spend your careers in one. No wonder we seem so fascinated with hospitals. We'll explore the history of the modern hospital with a focus on Johns Hopkins Hospital, the nation's best, nineteen years and counting.


DISCOVER HOPKINS HEALTH STUDIES:

Introduction to Lab Research

  • Session I

Course Number: AS.020.120.41 (1 credit)
Instructor: Kylie Chew

  • Session II

Course Number: AS.020.120.51 (1 credit)
Instructor: Kylie Chew

  • Session III

Course Number: AS.020.120.61 (1 credit)
Instructor: Kylie Chew

Description: This course will introduce students to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, students will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects.

 

 

DISCOVER HOPKINS HEALTH STUDIES:
Bioethics: An Introduction

  • Session III

Course Number: AS.360.126.61 (1 credit)
Instructor: Ishan Dasgupta

Description: Bioethics in Scientific Advancement, Public Health & Care: From use of stem cells to health policy to the ethics of everyday clinical practice, bioethical issues interact with the lives and interest of the public more and more each year. Television shows doctors making difficult - sometimes unethical - choices to try and save their patients. Movies focus on how we might respond to an outbreak of a lethal virus, while others portray dystopian futures full of cyborgs or pervasive human enhancement. However, entertainment shines light on only a small part of the issues that bioethics addresses. It helps us ask what are our values, duties, and responsibilities when faced with these sorts of difficult choices. In this class, we will focus on five major areas in bioethics - Scientific Advancement; Neuroethics; Public Health & Health Policy Ethics; Clinical Ethics; and Research Ethics. Through lectures, A/V materials (television and movies), case-based discussions, debates, and other student-led activities, we will explore each area in-depth, focusing on historic and especially current controversies. Students should expect to read nightly and participate in lecture sessions, case discussions, and debates. Students will be graded on participation, as well as multiple choice/true-false tests and short answer/essay assessments.

 

DISCOVER HOPKINS HEALTH STUDIES:
Food, Nutrition, and Public Health

  • Session III

Course Number: AS 360.115.61 (1 credit)
Instructor: Elizabeth Anderson Steeves

Description: With the creation of President Barak Obama’s Task Force on Childhood Obesity, there is finally a national focus on the importance of childhood nutrition. First Lady Michelle Obama spearheads the “Let’s Move!” initiative, dedicated to the goal of eradicating childhood obesity through an emphasis on diet and physical activity. This class will tackle the issue of food, nutrition and health from the ground up; looking at multiple behavioral, cultural, and environmental factors that influence what and why we eat. We will also look at how our food systems and eating habits impact the health of individuals, communities, our country, and the world. In this two week session students will have a variety of experiences including trips to a Baltimore City urban farm, the Maryland Food Bank, farmer’s markets, one of Baltimore’s traditional public markets, and a sustainably-sourced restaurant (the famed Woodberry Kitchen). Students will hear a variety of guest speakers.

 

BACK TO TOP

PROGRAM SCHEDULE:

Monday - Friday
9:30 AM - 4:30 PM

SESSIONS:

  • Session I
    June 22 - July 4 (residential)
    June 21 - July 3 (commuter)
  • Session II
    July 6 - 19 (residential)
    July 7 - 18 (commuter)
  • Session III
    July 20 - August 2 (residential) July 21 - August 1 (commuter)

 

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ESL

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Engineering

Engineering Innovation engages pre-college students in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education, inspires them to consider further studies and careers in engineering, and provides an understanding of basic engineering principles and skills.
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